Semi-Vacation  |   We're publishing archive favorites and fresh weekday headlines through Labor Day

Ads via The Deck

Late Night Sports Radio

Before Sunrise, Nobody Cares About Tennis

Before Sunrise, Nobody Cares About Tennis
Credit: discosour

A few days ago I awoke and tuned my transistor to WFAN. It was around 4:31 a.m. Lori Rubinson was hosting the call-in show. Immediately she went to a break. The advertisements were for: MJHS, Metropolitan Jewish Health System, a home health provider; Midas “total car care”; GEICO insurance; Brooklyn Burger, hamburgers sold at sports venues and available frozen in boxes of 12.

Health care for the elderly, automobiles, insurance, and frozen hamburgers—that just about covers it.

Rubinson returned to the air. She was excited about the NFL preseason games and training camps. She’d visited the Giants camp earlier that day. While recapping the previous two and a half hours of her show, she mentioned that a football beat writer from one of the local papers had been on earlier that morning. Rubinson is the only overnight host I know that has writers make guest appearances at 3 a.m. Most of the overnight hosts chat casually, relying on the nocturnal pulse of callers. I prefer that. You can hear pontificating professionals on sports radio at any hour of the day. How often can you listen to Alan (Allen?) from Coney Island, or Eric from Long Island?

Over in Queens, the U.S. Open tennis tournament began this week. It’s an annual ritual for a certain set of New Yorkers and I’d be included in that group if I were a New Yorker (I played tennis for 100 minutes in North Carolina yesterday). Thinking of tennis, and Caroline Wozniacki, I wonder how many women are listening to this station at 4:40 a.m. Or 4:40 p.m., for that matter. I don’t think many hardcore tennis fans are listening to sports radio at 4:40 a.m., either. I can’t remember ever hearing a caller make a comment about tennis.

Back to bed for a couple more hours of sleep.

Sam Stephenson is currently working on a biography of W. Eugene Smith for Farrar, Straus and Giroux.  He is also working on Chaos Manor, a theater installation based on his The Jazz Loft Project (Knopf, 2009). More by Sam Stephenson

blog comments powered by Disqus