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Gallery

Gallery owners don’t often show up in art themselves—probably because they’re too busy in meetings to pose.

But a gallery itself turns out to be as much a theatrical diorama as a place of business in Andy Freeberg’s dramatic photographs.

The last time we spoke to photographer Andy Freeberg, it was for his wonderful collection of women guarding art in Russia. His new show, “Art Fare,” is currently up at Kopeikin Gallery, Los Angeles, through October 2012. We talk below about the contemporary art market, napping, and dead artists.

Andy Freeberg was born in New York City and studied at the University of Michigan. He began his career as a photojournalist and now alternates his assignment work with fine art projects. His work has appeared in publications such as Time, Fortune, Der Spiegel, and Rolling Stone. His travel jobs have taken him to Europe, South America, Asia, and Africa, including two treks up Mt. Kilimanjaro. His photographs are in many collections, including the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and the George Eastman House Museum of Photography. He currently lives in the San Francisco Bay Area.

All images used with permission. All images © copyright the artist, all rights reserved.

TMN:

How would you describe the art world in the following cities in three words each: New York, London, LA, Miami?

Andy Freeberg:

New York: Above and beyond. LA: Spread way out. Miami: Best art parties. London: I haven’t been to London in years but I’m going in November so here’s three words: We’ll see soon.

TMN:

What’s your favorite thing to do in a shopping mall?

Andy Freeberg:

Finish shopping and head for the exit.

TMN:

If art was pie, how much of the filling should be entertainment?

Andy Freeberg:

Fifty percent. Sometimes I like to be entertained, sometimes I like to be challenged to think.

TMN:

Do you nap?

Andy Freeberg:

Only rarely.

TMN:

What do you do for exercise?

Andy Freeberg:

Power Yoga, digging in the garden, hiking.

TMN:

Will the art-gallery system end in your lifetime?

Andy Freeberg:

I don’t think so. Most artists can’t deal with business and they’ll always need someone to handle the buyers and promote them.

TMN:

When is your best time of day?

Andy Freeberg:

Just after my first cup of coffee in the morning

TMN:

What are you least aware of when you’re working?

Andy Freeberg:

Linear time.

TMN:

Best place to sit in your home?

Andy Freeberg:

I live in the woods at the base of a mountain so I love to sit out on the deck and watch the wildlife—as long as my neighbor’s kid isn’t practicing his saxophone.

TMN:

Living artist you strongly disagree with?

Andy Freeberg:

Damien Hirst’s dot paintings, which are actually done by his assistants, are a bit annoying to me.

TMN:

Dead artist who’s under-appreciated?

Andy Freeberg:

Milton Rogovin. He died last year at 101. He made some great photographs in Buffalo.

TMN:

What’s your favorite camera at the moment?

Andy Freeberg:

My Canon 5d Mark II, but I’m starting to enjoy my smartphone camera for snapshots.

TMN:

What do you value most in your kitchen?

Andy Freeberg:

My one sharp knife.

TMN:

Do dreams have value?

Andy Freeberg:

Anything that fuels the imagination, or is an outlet for it, has value.

TMN:

Philip Glass says, “The question is: What’s the mill? Not: What’s the grist?” Agree?

Andy Freeberg:

Agree.